A Family of Bitter Herbs Makes for Good Food, and Medicine

Most of us like sweet. But what about bitter? This week on the Local Food Report, Elspeth Hay talks with herb farmer Donna Eaton from Dennis about a bitter family of herbs that have a long history of use as both food and medicine. The genus Artemisia includes tarragon, mugwort, southernwood, and over 180 other herbs known for their bitter flavor and the silvery green color of their leaves, and many grow wild on the Cape.

You can find a recipe for tarragon vinaigrette and learn more about planting Artemisias on Elspeth’s blog, Diary of a Locavore.

Donna Eaton will be hosting an all day workshop on Artemisia Saturday, May 3rd from 9am to 4pm. You can learn more on her website.

Spring Produce Thrives in Dennis Hoophouse

Most farmers and gardeners are just starting to get seeds in the ground. But Jeff Deck of Dennis uses a different model. This week on the Local Food Report, Elspeth visits the two greenhouses where he grows year round. She learns what varieties do well over the winter, and how he plants for a continuous harvest. You can find a recipe for a spring butter crunch lettuce salad with fresh carrots along with a list of opening dates for Cape farmers’ markets on her website.

Story Workshop Fall 2014: Listening Event

Thursday, November 20, 2014 at 7 p.m., Community Hall, 68 Water Street, Woods Hole, MA Nine Transom Story Workshop  students have spent eight weeks learning the craft of telling stories with sound. Join us for a public listening event on Thursday, November 20 at 7:00 at The Community Hall in Woods Hole to celebrate their work[…..]

Young Couple Opens Bean to Bar Chocolate Factory in Truro

The bean to bar chocolate movement is on the rise. This week on the Local Food Report, Elspeth Hay talks with a young couple in Truro who’ve opened a chocolate factory. She learns about sourcing beans, how the production process works, and what characteristics make for a top notch chocolate bar.

You can find a recipe for a chocolate bundt cake and see photos from Chequessett Chocolate’s factory on Elspeth’s blog, Diary of a Locavore.

Can We Bring Back River Herring? One Town is Ready to Try

Almost every town in Massachusetts has a Herring River or a Herring Pond. The migration of river herring from sea to coastal streams and ponds once marked an important rite of spring for New Englanders. For centuries, the small, oily fish were valued as both bait and an important food source. But today, taking river herring is illegal in Massachusetts because populations are so low. This week on the Local Food Report, Elspeth Hay learns about what led one Cape Cod town to dike its Herring River—and how it hopes to bring back both the health of the river, and the fish it was named for.

You can read more about this story and see more historic pictures on Elspeth’s blog, Diary of a Locavore.

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